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20121210
20121210
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
the bank of china to finance whatever part of the grant that was given to a123 batteries, we still have to pay that back. the taxpayers are still on the hook for baying back the deaf -- paying back the deficit-spending portion of that money even though it's now long, long gone. megyn: so we borrowed from china so that we could offer stimulus. we gave part of the stimulus to a123. a123 spent $100 million plus of the money, failed to succeed, and now that, those assets are going to china too. >> well, when you say it that way, megyn, you make it sound like it's not very much fun, i mean, my gosh. [laughter] megyn: china makes out well in this deal. i don't know about the american taxpayer though. >> they're doing pretty well in all of this. and the problem for the president today is his whole idea is i'm going to go to detroit and talk about how my economic strategy is working and that what we need to do is increase taxes on the top earners so that we can take that money and stimulate the economy. and as he says, invest in the middle class. and as he says, keep the tax rates down for thos
for the group. he was promoted second-in-command earlier this year. >>> back to the economy now, china apparently going on an american spending spree. a chinese company agreed to buy a big chunk of insurance giant aig for more than $4 billion after the company got a huge bailout during the u.s. financial crisis. that is not the only bargain that china is picking up from u.s. taxpayers lately. stuart varney on this morning, head of "varney & company" on fox business network. good morning, stuart. good to see you. >> good morning, martha. martha: they're gobbling up our assets in many ways . what do you make of it. >> they are spending the money they have got buying american assets cheap. you mentioned aig. a chinese company is paying $4 billion for aig's plane leasing business. aig remember got $189 billion as a bailout fund that was back in september of 2008. the taxpayers still are the largest shareholder in aig. we sold the plane leasing business to china cheap. second item, a 123 batteries, americans taxpayers gave that company $249 million in grants and another 250 million in tax s
other. they discovered they were twin sisters separated from birth in china it is against the one of the girls was given up for adoption. they share mannerisms and they were married in the same year. the husband has the same first name. >> steve: and they dress alike. >> gretchen: what a fantastic story. the rest of the headlines ttook over 50 years for the murderer of a 7 year old to b brought to justice. jack mccullah will be sentenced for the murder. it is one of the oldest unsolved crimes. he was dismissed as a suspect but arrested last year after the investigation reopened. >> steve: meanwhile a 22 year old woman in oregon jumped in her car and drove off after two kids tried to rob her at gun point. the boys later to be found 7 and 11 years old. demanded money and her phone. >> i was afraid he would shoot my tires or window. i didn't think i was safe. >> brian: the boys were caught and turns out the gun was not loaded it is not known how they got the gun. they were turned over to their familis and the case is expected to go to jv court. >> brian: two students are accused of b
for its missile program in china. we know they buy things for their gas centrifuge program in china. some things are made in germany. probably made in the u.s. china has been a major gap in this whole system. on sanctions and north korea could face tougher action from china might constrict some of its ability to buy things that it absolutely needs for its nuclear programs. jon: you think it is likely american-made technology is helping north korea with its missile program? >> could be. i don't know the missile program nearly as well as the nuclear but what north korea does, it uses china a sense as a transshipment point because many companies, high-tech companies from america, from europe, have subsidiaries in china, selling to chinese industries and trading companies. north korea works that system very well to end up with those kinds of high-tech items from outside china. and so while i can't speak specifically on the missile program i certainly can on the nuclear and yes, indeed, north korea buys european high-tech equipment and likely u.s. equipment. so it's a problem. china has been m
is a commodity product. the steel we sell is the same as the steel made in china or india. there is a big difference, though. in america the rates from much higher. how does the company like mine compete in a global environment where products from china and india and europe are crashing on our shores? >> they are dumping product by having government subsidies to chien needs products that are often then subsidized so they can put you guys out of business on the entire market. that's what a lot of americans don't understand. it's frustrating to me. >> there is probably an even more important point about the product that is that our own government is making it more difficult for us to compete. >> how are they doing that? >> president obama is making the rounds. he is going to help us out by increasing our taxes. the only way we can beat governor is by investing in equipment. if the wage rates are lower in china and steel costs the same electricity costs the same the only way i can business is to have better gimeequipment ane only way to have better equipment is to continually investment the
by companies like mine. our product is a qualities product. it's the same as sold in china and india. it's a big difference, the question is how does a company like mine compete in a global environment where china, india and europe are on our shore. >> they're having government subsidies to chinese products so they can put guys like you out of business and that's what a lot of americans don't understand. it's frustrating to me, that's correct. but there's probably a lore important point about the product and that is that our government is making it difficult for us compete. and the tax policy, president obama is telling small business people like myself, he's going to help out by raising taxes. . the only way is to invest in equipment and fuel costs the same, electricity costs the same. the only way i can have more is to have better equipment. the only way to invest is to be profitable and removes small profits and unable to-- wage gross decreases. >> a lot of businesses seem to do okay. ge didn't pay any taxes, so biggest organizations are finding ways to be circumvent the complexities
a prerequisite. low cost living over all. we see gasoline prices dropping by $0.08. a lot of growth china not using as much oil. that is behind the price drop. >> some taking long trips on the holidays it is easier to stop along the way. >> some have stakeouts south carolina was the lowest. i will tell them to fill up the tanks there before we go on the road. >> a lot are pulling out the stops so they can spend some money. >> also get in the mood, too. bobble bar have a physical location in new york city they have free scotch in there to try to loosen them up and purchase a few more bobbles out there. the gap banana republic giving away a fee at. you have starbucks $250 gift card membership cards there with free coffee or a month. they are pulling out all of the stops to get you there. >> you have the least satisfying careers and most satisfying careers. >> my plan.com looked at the top 300 and bottom 300 of jobs out there. let's look at the least happy person. mail clerk. i am not talking about the box office. perhaps this is motivation to get out of the mail room and move up the ladder.
. >> an analyst in south korea believes the international pressure could be a factor in the delay because china may have sent a strong message for the north to cancel the launch plan and the technical glitches in the third stage of the rocket could have only been a cover. that is speculation we cannot confirm. >>shepard: is anyone talking about openings to slow them down? >>guest: whatever lessons are applied to the missile launch could be learned from sanctioned applied to iran with a growing consensus the sanctions could be working and they could be applied to impose greater sanctions on north korea working with allies and the united states, especially true if light the fact that many components for missiles and north korea's nuclear program come from abroad. there is a risk that more sanctions end up hurting ordinary people in north korea. >> in an initial stage, yes, a lesson of iran at some point the sanctions can bite so deeply that the average person is going to suffer. now, these sanctions on north korea will probably make it harder on the elite. >> the six-nation talks to give north ko
get a share of the proceeds. the company from china disagrees. decision could be months away. finally, it's like the seven-second delay on steroids. the state department is reportedly considering drastically rewriting its rules on social media novembering geinvolving two daye a tweet. "washington post" says the move may be in the wake of a scandal involving around a tell-all book but it's worth noting that the u.s. embassy in cairo egypt ran in trouble over tweeted apology over the anti-islam film that surfaced before the terror attack in benghazi, libya. there is a renewed battle going on tonight in california about renewable energy. specifically, solar power. it's about profit versus loss. tax collectors versus the taxpayers. correspondent william la jeunesse lays it all out for us. >> there will be screwups and bankruptcies. indictments and deaths. but we are going to keep going. >> critics be damned says governor jerry brown who backed solar energy regardless of cost or consequence. >> we're opposed to that obviously because we will be the ones to live with it forever. >> riversid
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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